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03 Dec 2021

WHO expresses concern over false sense of security that vaccines have ended pandemic

WHO expresses concern over false sense of security that vaccines have ended pandemic

WHO expresses concern over false sense of security that vaccines have ended pandemic

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has expressed concern about a false sense of security that vaccines have ended the pandemic. 

Director-General of WHO, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, urged people to continue taking precautions to prevent infection even if they are already vaccinated. 

In a speech last night (November 24th), he said, "If you are vaccinated you have a much lower risk of severe disease and death, but you're still at risk of being infected and of infecting others. We cannot say this clearly enough; even if you are vaccinated, continue to take precautions to prevent becoming infected yourself and infecting someone else who could die." 

According to Dr Tedros, vaccines reduced transmission by approximately 60% before the arrival of the Delta variant, and with Delta that has now dropped to about 40%. 

He said, "If you are vaccinated you have a much lower risk of severe disease and death, but you're still at risk of being infected and of infecting others. We cannot say this clearly enough; even if you are vaccinated, continue to take precautions to prevent becoming infected yourself and infecting someone else who could die." 

RTE reported in October that the president of the Royal College of Physicians Ireland (RCPI), Professor Mary Horgan, warned people get a false sense of security due to Ireland's high vaccination rate. 

She reportedly said the basics such as hand hygiene and mask wearing are "so, so important". 

Dr Tedros recommends continuing infection prevention techniques such as mask-wearing, maintaining distance, avoiding crowds and meeting others outside or inside in a well-ventilated space. 

He concluded: "We continue to call on all governments to implement a comprehensive and tailored approach of public health and social measures to prevent transmission, take the pressure off health systems and save lives. And it's vital that countries get patients that need care into the clinical care pathway earlier. That applies to all countries in all situations." 

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